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A Necklace for Me is Freedom for Her - A Necklace For Me

A Necklace for Me is Freedom for Her

A Necklace for Me supports women and children living in extreme poverty. We work with local non-profits to empower women and girls to fight gender based violence and improve economic independence of women. Since the girls and women who we serve work in the marketplace selling vegetables, they do not make products like jewelry that we can sell. We decided to curate a quality affordable fine jewelry collection (and maybe even a little exotic jewelry) the sale of which will support GBV initiatives. Whenever we sell a piece of jewelry, a portion of the sale goes to the programs we work with and people we trust.

Fighting Violence Against Women and Girls

A Necklace for Me is a Richer Me, Inc store. We support women and children living in extreme poverty. We work with local non-profits to empower women and girls to reduce gender based violence and improve economic independence. Since the girls and women who we serve work in the marketplace selling vegetables, they do not make products that we can sell. Instead, we curate a quality affordable fine jewelry collection (and maybe even a little exotic jewelry). Whenever we sell a piece of jewelry a portion of the sale goes to the programs we work with and people we trust.

 

A Necklace for Me could be considered our second jewelry store. In 2010, one of our founders, Dr. Christina Blanchard established a non-profit to serve orphans and vulnerable children in Uganda. She bought local beaded necklaces from women entrepreneurs and gave them to our donors when they made a contribution during events in the US. There was very little online presence, which might have helped. It was a nice project, they funded healthcare for orphans and gave out mosquito nets to reduce malaria for more than 300 children. The FaceBook Page  is actually still online. It's name, a play on the word mother, was called Matré Group. One fundraising program was called Beads for Health. After negotiating jewelry from a dependable supplier, we began offering the necklaces, earrings, and bracelets when donations were made.

 

The quality of the jewelry was casual. There were some handmade glass pieces.  There was also paper jewelry, a rather unique concept.  The non-profit was closed in 2017. The Facebook page is still live. It was possible that maybe one day it would re-open. 

 

But, when my daughter suggested we start a jewelry store, I jumped at the chance. This time we would sell fun affordable fine jewelry that will make a difference in the lives of women and children. We strive for a world free from gender based violence, where women are free to have her own assets.  That's why we say "a Necklace for Me is Freedom for Her." 

 These are not just random programs that we support. I spent 25 years working in poor communities around the globe. While working on programs in Africa and India, I developed some lasting friendships with colleagues, who have developed impressive programs that deserve support. 

In a rural community of Uganda, we support a program that gives no interest loans to women who work in the marketplace.  If they pay the $50 loan in three months, they pay no interest and can borrow again for three months with no interest. We find that women use the funds to start their market stall or to pay hospital bills. In rural communities there are few banks that will loan money to a poor rural woman. 

 We are also funding a project that works to address gender based violence in Sierra Leone, like rape. It's called the 9 to 19 Girls Platform Initiative . Their goals to

 

  • Improve Child Protection 
  • Address Sexual and Gender Based violence
  • Provide Inclusive Education for Girls
    • Water And Sanitation Hygiene (WASH)
    • Adolescent Sexual Reproductive Health

 

The 9 to e19 Girls Platform Initiatives serves young girls in rural communities who are at risk of gender based violence at schools.

Gender Based Violence in the School (SRGBV) setting includes acts or threats of sexual, physical, and/or psychological violence occurring in and around schools and universities is perpetrated by gender norms and stereotypes. It is enforced by unequal power dynamics. School Related Gender based violence is commonly experienced and perpetrated enroute to and from school, in and around school grounds including school toilets, and even in cyberspace. Women, girls, men, and boys can experience violence that is used to assert and reproduce gender roles and norms.  There are five major forms that we address.

 

  • bullying, including physical and verbal (or psychological) violence;
  • corporal punishment;
  • sexual violence and child sexual abuse;
  • sexual harassment; and
  • intimate partner violence (adolescent dating violence).

 We hope you will enjoy our curated selection of fun fine affordable jewelry for men and jewelry for women.  The women and girls you support with your purchase appreciate your support.

Comments

  • Posted by Christina Blanchard on

    I have been working with these communities for 25 years. Women and children in rural communities suffer most during this difficult time. Women also become the target of social frustration. We want to put joy in the art of giving. Treat yourself while you help someone in need. Thank you

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